Kickstarter has become a popular method for inventors, artists and others to obtain funds for their projects. As consumers, Kickstarter and other crowdfunding campaigns are a great way to get involved early with attractive new products, often getting discounts from the seller as a reward for their early involvement.

The problem is that the crowdsourcing model is based on trust, and sometimes the seller does not live up to that trust. In too many cases, buyers sit and wait and they never see the product they paid for. What can a consumer do if the seller is not delivering?

Attorney Todd M. Friedman Speaks Out

In a recent case, a woman invested $350 through Kickstarter.com for a high-tech handbag from a London-based designer. Her donation came with a promise from the designer that they would send her one of their handbags. But a year after the promised delivery date, still no handbag.

The handbag designer raised a total of $130,000, and it seems that none of the company’s backers have received their handbags. And the people at Kickstarter.com were no help in making the seller deliver on their promise.

In the report of this case on NBCUniversal, our own attorney Todd M. Friedman spoke out against Kickstarter’s non-involvement in these situations, saying, “I think ethically and from a business-model standpoint they would want to do something to step in.”

Attorney Todd M. Friedman has represented many consumers who have been victimized by this type of fraud in a variety of contexts. If you have been cheated by a Kickstarter or other crowdsourcing fraud, talk with an experienced lawyer who can help you obtain compensation for your losses.

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